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Solder ring fittings

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Bogart, Aug 9, 2017.

Discuss Solder ring fittings in the Plumbing Forum area at UKPlumbersForums.co.uk.

  1. Bogart

    Bogart New Member

    Not had need to do any solder ring fittings for a few years now. Recently have done a couple of lots last today where I, like previous attempt, could not get a ring of solder to appear. My technique is the same. The joints do not leak but I do like to see the solder ring as it gives me confidence in its integrity. Both sets of fittings are the same batch couyld they ebe faulty or has there been any change? though I doubt that. Oh by the way am using same gas torch as in previous years.
     
  2. townfanjon

    townfanjon Trusted Plumber GSR Top Contributor!!

    You should always see the solder ring pal , are you heating them long enough ?
     
  3. ShaunCorbs

    ShaunCorbs Trusted Plumber GSR Top Contributor!!

    Some don't normally the cheap ones where there isn't quite enough to see it quick dab of solder soon sorts it right out
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    When they changed the solder from leaded to unleaded, it certainly made the solder ring Yorkshire type fittings different to solder.
    I would suggest you put flux on the edge of fitting as you solder and use gentle heat and you should see a ring of solder appearing.
    Add a little solder, with the solder wire end dipped in flux and that proves solder is melting and flowing
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. king of pipes

    king of pipes Trusted Plumber GSR Top Contributor!!

    Burnish the end of the pipe with a cleaning pad only apply the flux to the pipe not inside the fitting use sparingly insert the pipe into the fitting apply a moderate heat with your blow torch untill you see the solder run apply a small amount of lead free solder if needed. Cheers kop
     
  6. Bogart

    Bogart New Member

    Not doing anything different to in the past. Oh and by the way are you going to Palace saturday?UTT
     
  7. Bogart

    Bogart New Member

    The fittings are from a reputable source and I do put a dab of flux on the pipe, and the fitting maybe just an odd batch. Will get some others and have try with those.
     
  8. townfanjon

    townfanjon Trusted Plumber GSR Top Contributor!!

    Not sure on your word dab lol , put a light smear of flux all the way around the pipe .

    Palace , nah ! I wouldnt mind but London away trips just take too long , my god I cant wait for this season pal .
     
  9. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    Too much heat usually applied IMO and this can tarnish the pipe, preventing the solder coming out.
    The Surefire type torches are very powerful and more heat than the 15mm and 22mm fittings need.
    Less heat and more flux.
     
  10. Matchless.plumb

    Matchless.plumb Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    I am soldering exactly in the same technique and I hardly see my solder :) it always looks like I will have leak but due to the capillary effect it sucks all the solder in and makes a proper neat seal.
     
  11. Chuck

    Chuck Top Contributor!!

    A traditional plumber's solder (70/30 Pb/Sn) melts in the range 185-250°C and has a working range of 240-330°C. A lead-free plumber's solder (99.3Sn/0.7Cu) melts at 227°C and has a working range of 300-450°C

    So, if your previous technique was honed for 70/30 and in the lower end of the working range you will need a bit more heat (but don't go mad) with the lead-free fittings. Buy a few extra fittings and make up and pressure test some test joints.

    Another possibility is that lead-free solders have a higher surface tension than traditional solders and hence form a less visible fillet, which could be the phenomenon you are seeing.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  12. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    If you want to experiment with soldering technique, then use end feed fittings. Cheaper and better.
    For heating system pipework, you could use leaded solder and this will also obviously be cheaper and with the advantage of easier to do
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Matchless.plumb

    Matchless.plumb Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!


    I have already done it many times to perfect my soldering. I was always unsure if I would have some leaks afterwards. I only use lead free solder can't work with leaded solder.
     
  14. Matchless.plumb

    Matchless.plumb Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    That's what I only use I don't like much Yorkshire fittings.
     
  15. Chuck

    Chuck Top Contributor!!

    Yeah, sorry, I replied to the wrong post and clicked 'post' accidentally before finishing editing it.

    I was trying to reply to Boggart's original post. For some reason the forum doesn't 'thread' posts for me so I find it easy to get confused and end up replying to the wrong person. Is this just me?
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
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